Special Section on Nanostructures Honoring Craig F. Bohren

Optical properties of cosmic dust analogs: a review

[+] Author Affiliations
Thomas Henning

Max-Planck-Institut fu¨r Astronomie, Ko¨nigstuhl 17, Heidelberg, D-69117 Germany

Harald Mutschke

Friedrich Schiller University, Astrophysical Institute and University Observatory (AIU), Schillergaesschen 2-3, Jena, Thuringia D-07745 Germany

J. Nanophoton. 4(1), 041580 (April 7, 2010). doi:10.1117/1.3417067
History: Received January 15, 2010; Revised March 24, 2010; Accepted March 29, 2010; April 7, 2010; Online April 07, 2010
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Abstract

Nanometer- and micrometer-sized solid particles play an important role in the evolutionary cycle of stars and interstellar matter. The optical properties of cosmic grains determine the interaction of the radiation field with the solids, thereby regulating the temperature structure and spectral appearance of dusty regions. Radiation pressure on dust grains and their collisions with the gas atoms and molecules can drive powerful winds. The analysis of observed spectral features, especially in the infrared wavelength range, provides important information on grain size, composition and structure as well as temperature and spatial distribution of the material. The relevant optical data for interstellar, circumstellar, and protoplanetary grains can be obtained by measurements on cosmic dust analogs in the laboratory or can be calculated from grain models based on optical constants. Both approaches have made progress in the last years, triggered by the need to interpret increasingly detailed high-quality astronomical observations. The statistical theoretical approach, spectroscopic experiments at variable temperature and absorption spectroscopy of aerosol particulates play an important role for the successful application of the data in dust astrophysics.

© 2010 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Thomas Henning and Harald Mutschke
"Optical properties of cosmic dust analogs: a review", J. Nanophoton. 4(1), 041580 (April 7, 2010). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3417067


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