Review Papers

Light-driven artificial molecular machines

[+] Author Affiliations
Yue Bing Zheng, Qingzhen Hao

Pennsylvania State University, Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, 212 Earth-Engineering Sciences Building, University Park, PA 16802

Ying-Wei Yang

University of California, Irvine, Department of Chemistry, 1102 Natural Sciences 2, Irvine, CA 92697

Brian Kiraly, I-Kao Chiang, Tony Jun Huang

Pennsylvania State University, Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, 212 Earth-Engineering Sciences Building, University Park, PA 16802

J. Nanophoton. 4(1), 042501 (August 25, 2010). doi:10.1117/1.3489361
History: Received May 22, 2010; Revised August 17, 2010; Accepted August 19, 2010; August 25, 2010; Online August 25, 2010
Text Size: A A A

Abstract

Artificial molecular machines represent a growing field of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Stimulated by chemical reagents, electricity, or light, artificial molecular machines exhibit precisely controlled motion at the molecular level; with this ability molecular machines have the potential to make significant impacts in numerous engineering applications. Compared with molecular machines powered by chemical or electrical energy, light-driven molecular machines have several advantages: light can be switched much faster, work without producing chemical waste, and be used for dual purposes-inducing (writing) as well as detecting (reading) molecular motions. The following issues are significant for light-driven artificial molecular machines in the following aspects: their chemical structures, motion mechanisms, assembly and characterization on solid-state surfaces. Applications in different fields of nanotechnology such as molecular electronics, nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS), nanophotonics, and nanomedicine are envisaged.

© 2010 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Yue Bing Zheng ; Qingzhen Hao ; Ying-Wei Yang ; Brian Kiraly ; I-Kao Chiang, et al.
"Light-driven artificial molecular machines", J. Nanophoton. 4(1), 042501 (August 25, 2010). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3489361


Figures

Tables

Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Topic Collections

PubMed Articles
Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.