Special Section on Nanostructured Thin Films: Fabrication, Characterization, and Application

Fabrication and realistic modeling of three-dimensional metal-dielectric composites

[+] Author Affiliations
Mark D. Thoreson

Purdue University, Birck Nanotechnology Center and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 1205 West State Street, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 vdrachev@purdue.edu

Friedrich-Alexander-Universität, Erlangen Graduate School for Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, 91052, Germany

Jieran Fang, Alexander V. Kildishev, Vladimir M. Shalaev, Vladimir P. Drachev

Purdue University, Birck Nanotechnology Center and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 1205 West State Street, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 vdrachev@purdue.edu

Ludmila J. Prokopeva

Institute for Computational Technologies, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia

Piotr Nyga

Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 00-908 Warsaw 49, Poland

Uday K. Chettiar

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104

J. Nanophoton. 5(1), 051513 (May 23, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3590208
History: Received January 17, 2011; Revised April 14, 2011; Accepted April 15, 2011; Published May 23, 2011; Online May 23, 2011
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Historically, the methods used to describe the electromagnetic response of random, three-dimensional (3D), metal-dielectric composites (MDCs) have been limited to approximations such as effective-medium theories that employ easily-obtained, macroscopic parameters. Full-wave numerical simulations such as finite-difference time domain (FDTD) calculations are difficult for random MDCs due to the fact that the nanoscale geometry of a random composite is generally difficult to ascertain after fabrication. We have developed a fabrication method for creating semicontinuous metal films with arbitrary thicknesses and a modeling technique for such films using realistic geometries. We extended our two-dimensional simulation method to obtain realistic geometries of 3D MDC samples, and we obtained the detailed near- and far-field electromagnetic responses of such composites using FDTD calculations. Our simulation results agree quantitatively well with the experimentally measured far-field spectra of the real samples.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Mark D. Thoreson ; Jieran Fang ; Alexander V. Kildishev ; Ludmila J. Prokopeva ; Piotr Nyga, et al.
"Fabrication and realistic modeling of three-dimensional metal-dielectric composites", J. Nanophoton. 5(1), 051513 (May 23, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3590208


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