Special Section on Nanoscale Morphology to Honor Russell Messier

Nanocrystalline structures in calcium carbonate biominerals

[+] Author Affiliations
Alejandro Rodriguez-Navarro

Departamento de Mineralogi´a y Petrologi´a, Universidad de Granada, Campus de Fuentenueva, Granada, Granada 18002 Spain

Concepcio´n Jimenez-Lopez

Departamento de Microbiologia, Universidad de Granada, Campus de Fuentenueva, Granada, Granada 18002 Spain

Angeles Hernandez-Hernandez

Laboratorio de Estudios Cristalograficos, Edificio Instituto Lo´pez Neira, Avda. del Conocimiento, Amilla, Granada 18100 Spain

Antonio Checa

Departamento de Estratigrafia y Paleontologia, Universidad de Granada, Campus Fuentenueva, Granada, Granada 18002 Spain

Juan M. Garcia-Ruiz

Laboratorio de Estudios Cristalograficos, Edificio Instituto Lo´pez Neira, Avda. del Conocimiento, Amilla, Granada 18100 Spain

J. Nanophoton. 2(1), 021935 (December 10, 2008). doi:10.1117/1.3062826
History: Received August 30, 2008; Revised December 3, 2008; Accepted December 4, 2008; December 10, 2008; Online December 10, 2008
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Abstract

Biological carbonate mineralization induced by both microorganisms and higher phyla organisms is very important in many different natural processes. The organisms precipitate calcium carbonate to form very sophisticated biomaterials that they used for many different functions. Organisms control calcium carbonate precipitation using specific organic macromolecules which are released at specific times and regulate crystal growth. Calcium carbonate crystals are formed and arranged in several representative biomaterials (e.g., avian eggshell, mollusk nacre and bacterially induced precipitates). Through these examples, we get an insight on how organisms are not only able to precipitate calcium carbonate but also comprehensively on how organisms control this process, during the nucleation, polymorphism selection and crystal growth stages, resulting in materials which highly reproducible characteristics at different scales from the nano- to the millimeter scale. The ordered arrangement of crystals in these materials is in part controlled by the organic matrix and in part determined by self-organization processes.

© 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Topics

Calcium ; Carbonates

Citation

Alejandro Rodriguez-Navarro ; Concepcio´n Jimenez-Lopez ; Angeles Hernandez-Hernandez ; Antonio Checa and Juan M. Garcia-Ruiz
"Nanocrystalline structures in calcium carbonate biominerals", J. Nanophoton. 2(1), 021935 (December 10, 2008). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3062826


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