Review Papers

Energy harvesting: a review of the interplay between structure and mechanism

[+] Author Affiliations
David L. Andrews

School of Chemical Sciences, University of East Anglia, Nanostructures and Photomolecular Systems, Norwich, Norfolk NR4 7TJ United Kingdom

J. Nanophoton. 2(1), 022502 (August 6, 2008). doi:10.1117/1.2976172
History: Received June 2, 2008; Revised July 25, 2008; Accepted July 29, 2008; August 6, 2008; Online August 06, 2008
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Abstract

The science of energy harvesting has recently undergone radical change, with the advent of new materials exploiting mechanisms fundamentally different from those of traditional solar cells. Utilizing principles that are in many cases acquired from breakthroughs in molecular photobiology, the introduction of a range of new synthetic polymers, multichromophore arrays and nanoparticle-based materials heralds a marked resurgence of interest, a shift of focus and heightened expectations in the science of light-harvesting. The interplay between structure and mechanism significantly impinges upon issues extending from fundamental theory to the principles of energy-harvesting materials design. Understanding and exploiting the principles allows materials to be engineered that can harness absorbed energy with heightened efficiency. Two of the key areas of application are dendrimers and rare-earth doped solids.

© 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

David L. Andrews
"Energy harvesting: a review of the interplay between structure and mechanism", J. Nanophoton. 2(1), 022502 (August 6, 2008). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2976172


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