Research Papers

Fluorescence quenching in ceria nanoparticles: dissolved oxygen molecular probe with relatively temperature insensitive Stern–Volmer constant up to 50°C

[+] Author Affiliations
Nader Shehata

Virginia Tech, Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061

Alexandria University, Department of Engineering Mathematics and Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Alexandria 21526 Egypt

Kathleen Meehan

Virginia Tech, Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061

Donald E. Leber

Virginia Tech, Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061

J. Nanophoton. 6(1), 063529 (Dec 03, 2012). doi:10.1117/1.JNP.6.063529
History: Received July 12, 2012; Revised September 20, 2012; Accepted October 29, 2012
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Abstract.  Ceria nanoparticles (7nm in diameter) were used as a molecular probe for dissolved oxygen sensing based on fluorescence quenching. Strong inverse correlation was found between the amplitude of the fluorescence emission at 520 nm (from excitation shift at 430 nm) and the dissolved oxygen concentration (between 5and13mg/L). The phenomenon employed depends on the concentration, diffusion, and reactivity of the oxygen vacancies in ceria. These vacancies are associated with the conversion of cerium ions from the Ce+4 to Ce+3 states. The Stern–Volmer constant, which is an indication of the sensitivity of gas sensing, was found to be 184.6M1 at room temperature. This constant shows good stability between 25°C to 50°C when compared to that of other currently used fluorophores in optical oxygen sensors.

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© 2012 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Nader Shehata ; Kathleen Meehan and Donald E. Leber
"Fluorescence quenching in ceria nanoparticles: dissolved oxygen molecular probe with relatively temperature insensitive Stern–Volmer constant up to 50°C", J. Nanophoton. 6(1), 063529 (Dec 03, 2012). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JNP.6.063529


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