Special Section on Metamaterials and Photonic Nanostructures

Large-scale sub-100 nm compound plasmonic grating arrays to control the interaction between localized and propagating plasmons

[+] Author Affiliations
Arash Farhang

EPFL-STI-IMT-NAM, Station 11, ELG 239, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland

Thomas Siegfried

Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, ODRA/100, 5232 Villigen-PSI, Switzerland

Yasin Ekinci

Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, ODRA/100, 5232 Villigen-PSI, Switzerland

Hans Sigg

Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, ODRA/100, 5232 Villigen-PSI, Switzerland

Olivier J. F. Martin

EPFL-STI-IMT-NAM, Station 11, ELG 239, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland

J. Nanophoton. 8(1), 083897 (Jan 09, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JNP.8.083897
History: Received August 8, 2013; Revised November 27, 2013; Accepted December 5, 2013
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Abstract.  Compound plasmonic resonances arise due to the interaction between discrete and continuous metallic nanostructures. Such combined nanostructures provide a versatility and tunability beyond that of most other metallic nanostructures. In order to observe such resonances and their tunability, multiple nanostructure arrays composed of periodic metallic gratings of varying width and an underlying metallic film should be studied. Large-area compound plasmonic structures composed of various Au grating arrays with sub-100 nm features spaced nanometers above an Au film were fabricated using extreme ultraviolet interference lithography. Reflection spectra, via both numerical simulations and experimental measurements over a wide range of incidence angles and excitation wavelengths, show the existence of not only the usual propagating and localized plasmon resonances, but also compound plasmonic resonances. These resonances exhibit not only propagative features, but also a spectral evolution with varying grating width. Additionally, a reduction of the width of the grating elements results in coupling with the localized dipolar resonance of the grating elements and thus plasmon hybridization. This newly acquired perspective on the various interactions present in such a plasmonic system will aid in an increased understanding of the mechanisms at play when designing plasmonic structures composed of both discrete and continuous elements.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Arash Farhang ; Thomas Siegfried ; Yasin Ekinci ; Hans Sigg and Olivier J. F. Martin
"Large-scale sub-100 nm compound plasmonic grating arrays to control the interaction between localized and propagating plasmons", J. Nanophoton. 8(1), 083897 (Jan 09, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JNP.8.083897


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