Research Papers

Plasmonic extinction in gold nanoparticle-polymer films as film thickness and nanoparticle separation decrease below resonant wavelength

[+] Author Affiliations
Jeremy R. Dunklin, Carter Bodinger

University of Arkansas, Ralph E. Martin Department of Chemical Engineering, 3202 Bell Engineering Center, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701, United States

Gregory T. Forcherio

University of Arkansas, Microelectronics-Photonics Program, 731 West Dickson Street, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701, United States

D. Keith Roper

University of Arkansas, Ralph E. Martin Department of Chemical Engineering, 3202 Bell Engineering Center, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701, United States

University of Arkansas, Microelectronics-Photonics Program, 731 West Dickson Street, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701, United States

J. Nanophoton. 11(1), 016002 (Jan 24, 2017). doi:10.1117/1.JNP.11.016002
History: Received June 14, 2016; Accepted December 28, 2016
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Abstract.  Plasmonic nanoparticles embedded in polymer films enhance optoelectronic properties of photovoltaics, sensors, and interconnects. This work examined optical extinction of polymer films containing randomly dispersed gold nanoparticles (AuNP) with negligible Rayleigh scattering cross-sections at particle separations and film thicknesses less than (sub-) to greater than (super-) the localized surface plasmon resonant (LSPR) wavelength, λLSPR. Optical extinction followed opposite trends in sub- and superwavelength films on a per nanoparticle basis. In 70-nm-thick polyvinylpyrrolidone films containing 16 nm AuNP, measured resonant extinction per particle decreased as particle separation decreased from 130 to 76 nm, consistent with trends from Maxwell Garnett effective medium theory and coupled dipole approximation. In 1-mm-thick polydimethylsiloxane films containing 16-nm AuNP, resonant extinction per particle plateaued at particle separations λLSPR, then increased as particle separation radius decreased from 514 to 408 nm. Contributions from isolated particles, interparticle interactions and heterogeneities in sub- and super-λLSPR films containing AuNP at sub-λLSPR separations were examined. Characterizing optoplasmonics of thin polymer films embedded with plasmonic NP supports rational development of optoelectronic, biomedical, and catalytic activity using these nanocomposites.

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© 2017 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Jeremy R. Dunklin ; Carter Bodinger ; Gregory T. Forcherio and D. Keith Roper
"Plasmonic extinction in gold nanoparticle-polymer films as film thickness and nanoparticle separation decrease below resonant wavelength", J. Nanophoton. 11(1), 016002 (Jan 24, 2017). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JNP.11.016002


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